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April Herbal Remedy: Violet


V I O L E T

Innocence, Abundance & True Love


Violet Blossoms Are to Eat. Violet Leaves Are to Drink

Spring is often thought of as a time to purify the body after the winter season and gain renewed energy for the lovely spring!


Violets are perfect for springtime because they help your body eliminate waste by stimulating the lymphatic glands to get rid of toxins in the body!


Medical Uses


Violet leaves and flowers have been used historically for the treatment of cancer and swollen glands.  The tea of the flowers, leaves, and sometimes the roots is used internally to help dissolve tumors and relieve congested tissue.  Herbalist Alma Hutchen says that violets’ dissolving properties “seem to have intricate inward skill, reaching places only the blood and lymphatic fluids penetrate.”  Herbalist Susan Weed uses violets internally as a tea and externally as a poultice to help heal fibrocystic breasts, breast cancer, and mastitis.  Violet has also been used in Native American and Chinese medicine for cancer and for shrinking tumors.  The action may be partly due to steroidal saponins found in the plant, which have a dissolving action that can increase the transfer of nutrients across cell membranes.

This delicate herb has a rich tradition in Europe as well, where it has been used for centuries as a pulmonary remedy for dry hacking cough. It is often recommended for bronchitis and whooping cough, along with the roots of marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) and licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra).


(Information by: Wildfiodsandmedicine.com, chestnutherbs.com)


V I O L E T R E C I P E S


//Violet Tea//


Dry violet leaves and flowers in baskets or paper bags.  Once completely dry, store in a jar or bag in a cool dark place. 

Use 1 tablespoon of dried leaf and flower per cup of hot water. 

Infuse for 10 minutes to several hours.

Drink 2-3 cups a day






//Violet Jelly Recipe//

Ingredients


3 heaping cups of fresh violet petals

4 C boiling water

1/4 C well-strained clear lemon juice

2 C raw sugar

1 box low sugar pectin

Directions:


Put clean violet flowers in a heatproof glass jar and pour boiling water over them. Cover and let steep at least two hours, overnight if fine. Strain the blue liquid into a stainless steel pot. Add the lemon juice and watch your blue infusion turn pinkish purple!!!

Mix the pectin with 1/2 cup of the sugar and add to the liquid, mixing very well. Bring to a hard boil that can not be stirred down. Add all the rest of the sugar at once and stir. Set timer once it comes back to a boil to 1 minute.

Do a jelly test.

*Use a cold spoon to see if it is set or using a spoon see if the jelly sheets off the spoon instead of dripping*. Get jars and lids prepared ahead of time and have canner hot. Fill jars, seal and process in water bath canner for 10 minutes.

Violet Infusion Recipe Add flowers and leaves to fill 1/3 – 1/2 of a pint size canning jar. Fill with boiling water, cover and steep 4 hours or overnight. Strain and drink. Add raw honey & lemon for taste and to change the color to a pinkish purple!



//Violet Hummus//


Prep Time: 15 min

Overall: 30 min


Ingredients:


1 head purple cauliflower, cut into florets (about 3 cups) 1 can (15 oz.) cannellini beans, drained and rinsed ½ cup olive oil ¼ cup lemon juice 2 Tbsp. tahini paste 1 tsp. minced garlic 1 tsp. salt ½ tsp. pepper ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper


Directions


Place cauliflower florets in a steamer insert over boiling water. Cover and steam 6-8 minutes until tender. Rinse with cold water. Place cauliflower, beans, oil, lemon juice, tahini, garlic, salt and pepper in the bowl of a food processor. Process until smooth. Refrigerate leftovers. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil, sprinkle of herbs, and some ground pepper.


!! Enjoy !!





HEALTH AND WELLNESS DISCLAIMER:


This blog is for educational purposes only and does not provide medical advice, but is meant to help you make your own dietary decisions based upon your own research and in partnership with your healthcare provider.

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